Accomplishment #8

I cleared out my inbox and parts of my archives and parts of my folders (then stuffed foldered emails into four folders: Writing To Do (which will be deleted ASAP), Scott Young, School, College Reference). School is for Romanian literature in the public domain, and College Refreence will disappear May of next year. I cannot wait. College searching is no fun when you have to put everything on hold for two weeks. All I can do now is locate textbooks for something to do in the next few months (and that is a whole other complicated thing I tried but didn’t succeed at today, because the parents have been away all day and I find I need an older-person opinion).

Also, I read a lot of things on how to edit, in preparation for Camp-NaNo-which-will-be-called-Editing-Month. After reading all those, I figured out a ‘quick’ 13 step process that I think will work best for me. Here it is, reproduced for your benefit. (you can find all the resources I used by googling ‘how to edit a novel’ and clicking all the links on the first page, then googling ‘one-pass revision’ and using the Holly Lisle link that pops up)

1. Read through. Check for bad plot, bad storytelling, etc. Use Chuck Wendig’s two column thing for the writing and storytelling.

2. Re-outline the beast as you read. (chapter, plot, core conflict and changes, comments)

3. Have the theme, subthemes, micro summary, main character story arc, and blurb written down. Print them out, hang them somewhere where reference to them is easy.

4. Do 10 scenarios. Find the best way to tell the story.

5. Do the re-re-outline, based on one of the ten scenarios. (same as the re-outline)

6. Take a deep breath. Print out the manuscript if you’re going to print it out. If not, save the Scrivener file somewhere, back it up, and duplicate the first draft somewhere. Don’t touch the first draft).

7. Print out the One-Pass Revision checklist which you either have created or will create.

8. Begin the One-Pass Revision. Take notes in a notebook next to the computer if necessary. Keep revising. NEVER GIVE UP.

9. Having finished the one-pass-revision, you will have good scenes, lovely grammar, and pretty spelling. Few typos, also. Make it clean, now, by making sure that there’s only black text. If you do the print-out, this is the ‘type-everything-onto-the-computer’ stage. Once you’ve done that, you’ve got

9b. Fix any typos you may have made while typing up.

10. Print out again, this time in ‘book’ form (or perhaps a Kindle). Read the whole thing out loud. Fix any malingering typos or weird sentences.  fix the typos on the laptop.

11. Give the manuscript to an ‘editor’ or ‘agent’ (or very good friend you trust to critique it)

12. Make any other needed revisions suggested by the agent-editor-friend.

13. Regale in awesomeness.

Tomorrow comes the step of assigning each of these steps to a certain day in July. I’m definitely not expecting to FINISH this in July, as actual real-life camp will interfere for 14 days, but I am planning on getting at least part of this done. Wish me luck!